Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

New poll: Florida’s Gov and Senate races virtual ‘toss-ups’
Florida Politics

New poll: Florida’s Gov and Senate races virtual ‘toss-ups’

422
0
170SHARES

Good news for Republicans. Good news for Democrats. Bad news for Republicans. Bad news for Democrats.

Good News for Democrats

The latest Suffolk University poll has Democrats Andrew Gillum and Bill Nelson up by a hair over their respective Republican opponents, Rick Scott and Ron DeSantis.

Trending: Marco Rubio Introduces TPS bill for Haitians

Bad News for Democrats

take our poll - story continues below

Did Trump Go Too Far With His "Democrats Don't Like It Here, They Can Leave" Quote?

  • Did Trump Go Too Far With His "Democrats Don't Like It Here, They Can Leave" Quote?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Floridian Press updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

They are barely up, hanging by a thread, if you would. Blue wave?

With 8 percent of those polled in the senate being undecided, and another 19 percent not sure of who they would vote in as governor, it looks as if these two races could be decided well after the polls close in the panhandle of the state.

By the numbers:

Senate Race

45%-Nelson

43%-Scott

10%-Undecided

+/- 4.4 percentage (margin of error)

Governor’s Race

45%-Andrew Gillum

44%-Ron DeSantis

8%-Undecided

Gillum led DeSantis among women (50 percent to 38 percent), young voters (50 percent to 34 percent), black voters (81 percent to 4 percent), and Hispanic voters (52 percent to 36 percent). DeSantis led among men (51 percent to 40 percent), older voters (61 percent to 31 percent), and white voters (53 percent to 37 percent). In the last seven days, both will vie for the votes of independents, where the undecided number is a significantly high 23 percent. Though 82 percent of voters said their minds are made up, just 64 percent of independents are sure, while 17 percent said they could change their mind, and 19 percent were undecided.-Suffolk University

170SHARES
Tagged:

Javier Manjarres is a nationally renowned award-winning South Florida-based political journalist owns Diverse New Media, Corp. which publishes Floridianpress.com, Judicialpost.com, shark-tank.com, and Hispolitica.com He enjoys traveling, playing soccer, mixed martial arts, weight-lifting, swimming and biking. He ran as a Republican in the 2018 congressional primary race in Florida's CD 22. Javier is also a political consultant, and has also authored "BROWN PEOPLE," which is a book about Hispanic Politics. Learn more at www.brownpeople.org Email him at [email protected]

Screen Shot 2019-02-08 at 3.11.25 PM
FeaturedFlorida Politics
“Green New Deal” is dead on arrival in U.S. Senate
Moderate-Democratic Senators like Arizona’s Kyrsten Sinema, who have not shown [...]
andrew gillum
Florida Politics
Gillum proposes higher corporate taxes for education
Gillum said the tax hike would be more than offset by a tax-cut package passed by Congress
trump veto
ArizonaFlorida PoliticsGeorgiaSouth CarolinaTexas
Trump makes good on threat, Vetoes Senate bill blocking his emergency edict
Staying true to his optic form, Trump lifted up the signed document for the world to see.